PLC Progression - Level 4 (Lifetime Access)

You'll receive

  • 4 Hours
    of video
  • Subtitles
    available

We’ve done it again. We have produced our fourth set of tutorials in our PLC Programming training series. As always, we are using our tried and true method of an easy learning approach to bring you yet another great collection of informational training videos to increase your programming skills.
We use our many years of combined control system design and programming experience to present these lessons in a logical learning approach.

In the first series of this training program we got you familiar with the basics of PLC Control Systems. We talked the about hardware, including power supplies and how the processor functions. We also talked about memory types, modules and their LED status lights, different I/O types and their use, and finally configuration.
In the second series of this training program we got right into programming. We discussed addressing and worked with many different instructions including flip flops, positive and negative edge detections, latched versus momentary, and many more. We also wrote some code for many common controls.

In the third series of this training program we continued with programming as we discussed different timer types, wrote some code using timers that was universal enough to use in different scenarios, discussed “two handed control”, talked about V13 of step 7. We also discussed counters, normally opened and normally closed contacts and much, much more.

In this fourth series, we start off discussing comparator instructions which are the equals, less than, greater than type instructions and then jump right into demonstrating the differences of the many data types.
We’ll then show you a program that will energize an output when multiple inputs are true at once. We will also go into detail about how to write programs that will work for extended timing, getting around the maximum value that may be entered into timing instructions.

Following those tutorials, we introduce you to some math instructions, discuss some conversion instructions, write a program that will alarm when one of our turbine temperature sensors is out of range, explain Decimal, Binary, and BCD numbers, and finish off with another great work around for the counter maximum count restriction.
We have produced another great set of tutorials with many great programming examples that will help you to develop a base of programs for many of your future needs.

This fourth course of wide-ranging tutorials is just what you need to take your skills to the next level. That Automation and Controls Engineer title is getting ever closer.

Purchase the latest series now and engross yourself into this set of foundational videos that will contribute to your knowledge on your quest to becoming a World Class PLC Programmer.

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4+ hours of video, instant streaming! This is a gift purchase for a friend. This is a gift purchase just for . They will receive their copy via email.

4+ hours of video, Watch as much as you want for 3 days. This is a gift purchase for a friend. This is a gift purchase just for . They will receive their copy via email.

PLC Progression - Level 4 (Lifetime Access)

We’ve done it again. We have produced our fourth set of tutorials in our PLC Programming training series. As always, we are using our tried and true method of an easy learning approach to bring you yet another great collection of informational training videos to increase your programming skills.
We use our many years of combined control system design and programming experience to present these lessons in a logical learning approach.

In the first series of this training program we got you familiar with the basics of PLC Control Systems. We talked the about hardware, including power supplies and how the processor functions. We also talked about memory types, modules and their LED status lights, different I/O types and their use, and finally configuration.
In the second series of this training program we got right into programming. We discussed addressing and worked with many different instructions including flip flops, positive and negative edge detections, latched versus momentary, and many more. We also wrote some code for many common controls.

In the third series of this training program we continued with programming as we discussed different timer types, wrote some code using timers that was universal enough to use in different scenarios, discussed “two handed control”, talked about V13 of step 7. We also discussed counters, normally opened and normally closed contacts and much, much more.

In this fourth series, we start off discussing comparator instructions which are the equals, less than, greater than type instructions and then jump right into demonstrating the differences of the many data types.
We’ll then show you a program that will energize an output when multiple inputs are true at once. We will also go into detail about how to write programs that will work for extended timing, getting around the maximum value that may be entered into timing instructions.

Following those tutorials, we introduce you to some math instructions, discuss some conversion instructions, write a program that will alarm when one of our turbine temperature sensors is out of range, explain Decimal, Binary, and BCD numbers, and finish off with another great work around for the counter maximum count restriction.
We have produced another great set of tutorials with many great programming examples that will help you to develop a base of programs for many of your future needs.

This fourth course of wide-ranging tutorials is just what you need to take your skills to the next level. That Automation and Controls Engineer title is getting ever closer.

Purchase the latest series now and engross yourself into this set of foundational videos that will contribute to your knowledge on your quest to becoming a World Class PLC Programmer.

41 Videos

  • 108. Introduction to Comparator Operations PLC Programming

    5m 32s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 109. What are Integer and double integer data types in PLC programming?

    5m 15s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 110. Real, Byte, Word, Double Word and Time data types in PLC programming

    6m 29s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 111. A few Practical Points on Comparator Operations

    3m 57s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 112. Factory Warehouse PLC Program _ Comparator Operations

    8m 43s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 113. Error Message While Entering Correct Data Type for Comparator Operations

    2m 28s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 114. Material Handling PLC Program _ Part 1

    5m 3s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 115. Material Handling PLC Program _ Part 2

    6m 0s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 116. Material Handling PLC Program _ Part 3

    5m 2s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 117. Material Handling PLC program - Part 4

    5m 24s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 118. Material Handling PLC program - Part 5

    2m 49s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 119. Parking Lot Entrance Barrier PLC Program - Part 1

    7m 59s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 120. Parking Lot Entrance Barrier PLC Program - Part 2

    3m 57s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 121. Energizing a PLC Output When a Group of Inputs Are All True

    9m 11s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 122. Extended Timing in PLC Programs Using Comparator Operations - Part 1

    7m 3s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 123. Extended Timing in PLC Programs Using Comparator Operations - Part 2

    4m 45s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 124. Extended Timing in PLC Programs Using Comparator Operations - Part 3

    6m 21s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 125. Extended Timing in PLC Programs Using Comparator Operations - Part 4

    4m 6s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 126. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 1

    6m 37s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 127. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 2

    6m 36s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 128. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 3

    6m 40s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 129. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 4

    6m 36s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 130. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 5

    10m · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 130-1. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 6

    11m · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 130-2. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 7

    4m 1s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 131. An Introduction to Math Functions - Part 1

    6m 27s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 132. An Introduction to Math Functions - Part 2

    5m 3s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 133. An Introduction to Math Functions - Part 3

    7m 25s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 134. An Introduction to Math Functions - Part 4

    5m 7s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 135. Gas Turbine Temperature Control PLC Program - Part 1

    5m 24s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 136. Gas Turbine Temperature Control PLC Program - Part 2

    6m 36s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 137. Gas Turbine Temperature Control PLC Program - Part 3

    9m 15s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 138. What Are Decimal, Binary and BCD Numbers?

    5m 19s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 139. How to Use Conversion Instructions in your PLC program

    6m 34s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 140. Why You're Getting "Invalid BCD" Error?

    6m 19s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 141. How to avoid "BCD Conversion Error" While Assigning a Variable Time Value to Timers? - Part 1

    6m 24s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 142. How to avoid "BCD Conversion Error" While Assigning a Variable Time Value to Timers? - Part 2

    6m 42s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 143. How to Use S7 Counters for Counting Higher than 999? Part 1

    10m · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 144. How to Use S7 Counters for Counting Higher than 999? Part 2

    6m 49s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 145. How to Use S7 Counters for Counting Higher than 999? Part 3

    6m 22s · Streamable only + subs available in English

  • 146. How to Use S7 Counters for Counting Higher than 999? Part 4

    6m 50s · Streamable only + subs available in English

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You'll receive the following videos

  1. 108. Introduction to Comparator Operations PLC Programming

    5m 32s · Streamable only

    Some of the most often used instructions in PLC programming are comparator operations. In all of the previous PLC programs that we have worked with so far, we have mostly worked with bits. A bit has only two possible values of one or zero, true or false and based on these limited values you can easily demand the desired command for a PLC output. You don't need comparator operations when you're working with bits but in reality, in almost all project...

    Subs available in English
  2. 109. What are Integer and double integer data types in PLC programming?

    5m 15s · Streamable only

    As indicated in a previous lesson, each comparator operation has a drop down menu where you can select between different data types.

    Now what are these used for? It's very simple. Every variable or constant that you use in your PLC program has a specific data type. When you're going to compare these variables or constants using comparator operations, you need to define the exact data type for the instructions as well. This means that you need t...

    Subs available in English
  3. 110. Real, Byte, Word, Double Word and Time data types in PLC programming

    6m 29s · Streamable only

    You became familiar with integer and double integer data types in the previous lesson. In this lesson you're going to become familiar with the rest of data types in comparator operations including real, byte, word, double word and time.

    Subs available in English
  4. 111. A few Practical Points on Comparator Operations

    3m 57s · Streamable only

    Before starting with practical PLC programming examples for comparator operations, I'd like to discuss a few practical points on how to use these instructions in your PLC program.

    Subs available in English
  5. 112. Factory Warehouse PLC Program _ Comparator Operations

    8m 43s · Streamable only

    In the previous lessons, in the section about counters, I wrote a PLC program to run a conveyor belt and count the number of products entering the factory warehouse. In this lesson, I'm going to develop that PLC program using the comparator operations in a way such that when the number of products is more than a certain number, a signal lamp will light up and let the operator know that the warehouse capacity is full.

    Subs available in English
  6. 113. Error Message While Entering Correct Data Type for Comparator Operations

    2m 28s · Streamable only

    In some cases, although you select the correct data type for the comparator operations, you'll see that there are still errors in the software.

    when you enter a variable for comparator instructions and you see that, despite considering all the parameters you'll constantly get an error, you need to check the PLC tag table and see what data type has been defined for the variable you're trying to use.

    Subs available in English
  7. 114. Material Handling PLC Program _ Part 1

    5m 3s · Streamable only

    In a section of a factory there are two conveyor belts that are used to move pieces from one sector to another. Next to each conveyor belt, there is a photo eye sensor installed to keep track of the boxes and also commanding the electrical motors to start and stop.

    In this and the next lesson, I'm going to walk you through a step by step process to write a PLC program that can control this machine.

    Subs available in English
  8. 115. Material Handling PLC Program _ Part 2

    6m 0s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson you learned how the machine works and what the input and output components are. In this lesson, I'm going to start writing a PLC program that would be able to control the machine in the best possible way.

    The PLC program that I'm going to write is going to address three main parts of the sequence as follows:
    1. Running motor 1
    2. Counting the small red boxes passing in front of sensor 1
    3. Turning on the "full" signal ...

    Subs available in English
  9. 116. Material Handling PLC Program _ Part 3

    5m 2s · Streamable only

    In part 3 of the material handling PLC program I'm going to test the program in the online mode and then continue writing the program based on what I want the PLC program to do for me.

    The first problem that this PLC program has is that when the full blue box is transferred to another section of the factory and the next blue box arrives in front of sensor 2, there is no code in the PLC program for stopping motor 2.

    The other problem is that...

    Subs available in English
  10. 117. Material Handling PLC program - Part 4

    5m 24s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson I added the address of the start switch in the reset input of the signal lamp flip-flop and now I'm able to run motor 1 by pressing the start switch but the problem is that as soon as I take my hand off the switch the motor is going to stop again!
    The other problem that this PLC program has is that when the big blue box is full, the signal lamp turns on and motor 1 stops automatically but motor 2 won't turn on like I want.
    ...

    Subs available in English
  11. 118. Material Handling PLC program - Part 5

    2m 49s · Streamable only

    As I said previously, I also have a reset switch for this machine. In this lesson, I'm going to add an open contact to the reset input of the counter so that when the reset switch is pressed the accumulated value for the counter is going to be reset to zero.
    At the end, when the PLC program is complete, I'm going to test the whole program once more, in the online mode, to make sure everything works exactly as I needed.

    Subs available in English
  12. 119. Parking Lot Entrance Barrier PLC Program - Part 1

    7m 59s · Streamable only

    In this lesson, I'm going to write a PLC program for a vehicle barrier at the parking entrance using a count up and down instruction and also two comparator instructions. What I need the vehicle barrier to do for me is, when the number of vehicles within the parking lot is equal to 500, it should block the parking entrance and when the number of vehicles is less than 495, the barrier should open.
    To count the number of vehicles entering and exitin...

    Subs available in English
  13. 120. Parking Lot Entrance Barrier PLC Program - Part 2

    3m 57s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson I wrote a PLC program to control the vehicle barrier in a parking lot entrance and also counting the number of the vehicles within the parking lot.
    In this lesson I'm going to write a short piece of code for turning on the signal lamp when the parking lot capacity is full.
    After completing the PLC program I will test that in the online mode to see if it works as I need it to.

    Subs available in English
  14. 121. Energizing a PLC Output When a Group of Inputs Are All True

    9m 11s · Streamable only

    In some projects you need a PLC output to be energized when a group of PLC inputs are all true at the same time. To write such a PLC program there are two ways:
    1. Writing the PLC program using what I call the "bit logic" approach
    2. Writing the PLC program Using the comparator operations
    In this lesson I will write a PLC program using both methods and then test them in the online mode.

    Subs available in English
  15. 122. Extended Timing in PLC Programs Using Comparator Operations - Part 1

    7m 3s · Streamable only

    As you know, the maximum amount of time that you can use on S7 or SIMATIC timers for timing is 2 hours 46 seconds. If you need larger timing values, one of the options might be using the IEC timers.
    If you're not interested in using IEC timers, the other option is to build your own customized timer by combining S7 timers with S7 counters.
    In the previous lessons, I wrote a PLC program that could easily extend timing to the desired amount for S7...

    Subs available in English
  16. 123. Extended Timing in PLC Programs Using Comparator Operations - Part 2

    4m 45s · Streamable only

    So far I've inserted a timer and a counter in the first network and also a flip-flop in the second network to turn on the fan. Now I'm going to show you how these programming elements should work together to be able keep the output energized continually for 15 seconds.

    Subs available in English
  17. 124. Extended Timing in PLC Programs Using Comparator Operations - Part 3

    6m 21s · Streamable only

    The problem with this program is, when I press the start switch, the timer times the 5 seconds once but I need the timer to time the 5 seconds 3 times in a row. Let's fix this by adding some additional code.

    Subs available in English
  18. 125. Extended Timing in PLC Programs Using Comparator Operations - Part 4

    4m 6s · Streamable only

    As I said in the previous lesson, the program is complete but it still has an issue. Let's find out what the problem is.

    Subs available in English
  19. 126. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 1

    6m 37s · Streamable only

    In this new video series we're going to write a PLC program for the process of assembling a series of components in a section of a factory. In this process, the final product will be manufactured by assembling two separate parts of the product together. This machine has two 3-phase electrical motors that are used to run the conveyor belts, two photo-eye sensors that are installed in two different positions, one hydraulic jack, and two momentary swi...

    Subs available in English
  20. 127. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 2

    6m 36s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson, you learned in fine detail, how this machine works. In this lesson I'm going to start writing the PLC program in a step-by-step, easy to follow format.

    Subs available in English
  21. 128. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 3

    6m 40s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson I wrote a PLC program that I expect to work based on the first diagram. According to this diagram, when the start switch is pressed, motor 1 is going to turn on.

    When sensor 1 sees the parts, motor 1 is going to stop for a few seconds, and the jack will be active after a 2 second delay.

    When the jack is energized, after a 5 second delay, this timer is going to be true.

    When the timer is true, the jack will be deac...

    Subs available in English
  22. 129. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 4

    6m 36s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson, I completed the PLC program for the first interruption caused by sensor 1 and tested it in the online mode as well to make sure that everything works within my expectations.

    As I promised in part 3 of this video series, I'm going to start writing the PLC program for the second interruption which is caused by sensor 2.

    Subs available in English
  23. 130. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 5

    10m · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson, I wrote a PLC program for the second interruption based on diagram 2. In this lesson, we're going to test the program in the online mode and then make the necessary changes to ensure that everything is working as we want it to.

    Subs available in English
  24. 130-1. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 6

    11m · Streamable only

    We have been playing around with this assembly line code for several lessons and have been informed by a RealPars student of a bug that we need to address. To refresh your memory, this code has a start and stop switch, 2 conveyor belts, a motor for each belt, 2 photo-eye sensors, and a jaw type clamping device that is controlled by a valve. In the previous lessons, we wrote different parts of the code and fixed issues found along the way.

    In thi...

    Subs available in English
  25. 130-2. Assembly Line PLC Program – Part 7

    4m 1s · Streamable only

    Now that you’ve come back to the video, what did you do? Could you fix the bug so that no one can run the motor by just passing their hands in front of sensor 2? If you have, congratulations! But if you haven’t, don’t worry, you’re going to learn that in this video.

    Subs available in English
  26. 131. An Introduction to Math Functions - Part 1

    6m 27s · Streamable only

    In some applications you may need to use assorted math instructions in your PLC program. In the programming environment, in the "basic instructions" section, there is a folder named "math functions". If you open this folder, you'll see a full list of math functions there. In this and the next lessons, I'm going to briefly introduce you to these instructions and then you're going to learn how to use them in PLC programs using some practical programm...

    Subs available in English
  27. 132. An Introduction to Math Functions - Part 2

    5m 3s · Streamable only

    In this new video you are going to learn how the "negative" and the "absolute value" instructions work.

    Subs available in English
  28. 133. An Introduction to Math Functions - Part 3

    7m 25s · Streamable only

    I have 3 other useful instructions or Functions in the math functions folder named MIN, MAX and LIMIT. The names should be self explanatory. The appearance of these functions is different from the other instructions in this folder because they're considered as FCs, and you may be familiar with these types of programming blocks. In this lesson you're going to learn how these functions work and what you should watch for when using them in your PLC pr...

    Subs available in English
  29. 134. An Introduction to Math Functions - Part 4

    5m 7s · Streamable only

    There are some other instructions in the math functions folder which you can use for specific mathematical operations like square SQR or square root SQRT. Let's find out how these actually work.

    Subs available in English
  30. 135. Gas Turbine Temperature Control PLC Program - Part 1

    5m 24s · Streamable only

    There are different applications across various industries where you need to measure and control the temperature of different factory sections. In this and then next lessons, you're going to learn how to write a PLC program using the math functions to measure a gas turbine gear box temperature and activate the necessary alarms when required.

    Subs available in English
  31. 136. Gas Turbine Temperature Control PLC Program - Part 2

    6m 36s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson, you learned that how the small portion of the alarm system for a gas turbine works. As I indicated, in this lesson I'm going to start writing a PLC program that will activate the alarms whenever the temperature measured by each sensor is out of range.

    Subs available in English
  32. 137. Gas Turbine Temperature Control PLC Program - Part 3

    9m 15s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson, I wrote a PLC program for a gas turbine gear box that was able to calculate the sum of the temperatures measured by the RTD sensors and then provide me with the average temperature. In this lesson, I'm going to use this average temperature for writing code for activating the required alarms.

    Subs available in English
  33. 138. What Are Decimal, Binary and BCD Numbers?

    5m 19s · Streamable only

    In some cases, when you're writing a PLC program, you may need to convert the data type of a variable or a number to a different type. For that, you'll need to use the conversion operations. In the next lessons, you're going to learn how to use these instructions in your PLC program but before that, I think we better have a quick review on decimal, binary and BCD numbers. You should make use of these numbers and also know the difference between the...

    Subs available in English
  34. 139. How to Use Conversion Instructions in your PLC program

    6m 34s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson we quickly reviewed the decimal, binary and BCD numbers. In this lesson you’re going to learn how to use conversion instructions to convert the data type of a variable or a number in your PLC program.

    Subs available in English
  35. 140. Why You're Getting "Invalid BCD" Error?

    6m 19s · Streamable only

    In some cases, when you’re using conversion instructions in your PLC program, you’ll face the “invalid BCD” error. In this lesson you’re going to learn what is the cause of this error and how you, as a PLC programmer, can avoid this error.

    Subs available in English
  36. 141. How to avoid "BCD Conversion Error" While Assigning a Variable Time Value to Timers? - Part 1

    6m 24s · Streamable only

    In the previous lessons you learned that when you want to use SIMATIC timers in your PLC programs you need to assign the time value as S5TIME format. For instance, if you want this timer here to time for 10 milliseconds, you need to enter S5T#10ms as the time value for the timer. But in some projects, you need to assign a variable as the time value instead of a fixed amount. For instance you can assign a memory address like MW0 as the time value fo...

    Subs available in English
  37. 142. How to avoid "BCD Conversion Error" While Assigning a Variable Time Value to Timers? - Part 2

    6m 42s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson you learned that you can assign a variable, like a memory address, as the time value for the timer instead of fixed amount. But you saw that, in this case, when you enter a value greater than 9, a "BCD conversion error" happens and that causes the CPU to stop working and the system fault LED to turn on. In this lesson you're going to learn exactly how that error happens and how you can avoid getting such an error in your PLC ...

    Subs available in English
  38. 143. How to Use S7 Counters for Counting Higher than 999? Part 1

    10m · Streamable only

    When you're using S7 or SIMATIC counters in your PLC program, one of the things that might be limiting in some projects is that these counters can only count up to 999 and not beyond that. That means, for instance, when you're using an S7 counter to count the number of the products passing on a conveyor belt, when the counter counts up to 999, it stops there and the counters accumulated value will not increment any further when it receives new inpu...

    Subs available in English
  39. 144. How to Use S7 Counters for Counting Higher than 999? Part 2

    6m 49s · Streamable only

    In the previous lesson you learned how you can build a customized counter by combining two counters to extend the amount that an S7 counter is able to count. As I previously explained, the basic idea here is since each of these counters can only count up to 999, I will combine them in a way that every time the first counter reaches the maximum amount, the counters accumulated value for the second counter is going to increment by one. Now the questi...

    Subs available in English
  40. 145. How to Use S7 Counters for Counting Higher than 999? Part 3

    6m 22s · Streamable only

    In the first two parts of this series you learned how you can combine two S7 counters and build a customized counter that is able to count amounts higher than 999. As you saw in the previous lesson I tested the software and everything seemed to work fine but believe it or not, the program has still a major flaw. In this lesson you're first going to learn what this flaw is and then you'll learn how you can solve of it.

    Subs available in English
  41. 146. How to Use S7 Counters for Counting Higher than 999? Part 4

    6m 50s · Streamable only

    It's clear for me now that the limitation that I have here is because the data type for the instructions are defined as integer so what do you think of changing the data type for the multiply instruction to double integer or long integer?

    Subs available in English