PLC Progression - Level 5  (Lifetime Access)

PLC Progression - Level 5 (Lifetime Access)

We’d like to introduce our fifth set of tutorials in our PLC Programming training series. Our easy learning approach is employed once again to assist you in your pursuit of becoming a PLC controls engineer.

We use a logical learning approach which we have perfected by pooling our vast knowledge about control system design and programming. We have many engineers with decades of combined experience in real world environments from which we draw the knowledge that is required to enable viewers to gain valuable PLC programming and control system skills.

In the first four series of this training program we got you familiar with the basics of PLC Control Systems, hardware, power supplies and how the processor functions. We also talked about memory types, modules and their LED status lights, different I/O types, configuration, addressing, flip flops, positive and negative edge detections, latched versus momentary, and many more instructions.
We discussed different timer types, discussed “two handed control”, and talked about V13 of step 7. We also discussed counters, normally opened and normally closed contacts, comparator instructions which are the equals, less than, greater than type instructions and then demonstrated the differences between the many data types, worked with extending timing, math, conversion instructions and much more.

In this fifth series we will introduce you to a new programming environment called Factory I/O and do several lessons in this factory environment. Within the Factory I/O environment, we’ll show you how you can simulate your program in 3D. We also have a miniseries of lessons on part counting with a retro-reflective sensor and in another lesson, we discuss how to convert an integer value to a real value. We will exhibit how to round a number, how to convert a real value to an integer value, using the move instruction, and controlling multiple outputs with a single switch.

We will talk about how you can manipulate a value in a single setpoint, vary a time value in a timer using a couple of different methods, resuming interrupted timing, and using a single switch to both start and stop a motor.

In our growing list tutorials, this is another installment of great programming examples where many may be used as good starting points from which to build on for future use.

This fifth series is a great tool for helping you to visually conceptualize your projects as well as help you hone your PLC programming skills. The Automation and Controls Engineer career could be just around the corner.
Advance your knowledge today by procuring this series and see how beneficial a simulated factory environment can be in furthering your understanding and expanding skill set.

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PLC Progression - Level 5  (Lifetime Access)

23 Videos

  • 147. Now You Can Simulate Your PLC Programs in a 3D Environment

    We recently received a partnership request from a European company based in Porto, Portugal named "realgames". They're focused on creating 3D education simulators and one of their main products is a 3D PLC simulator named factory I/O. This software offers numerous features and at the same time it...

  • 148. Part Counting PLC Program Using Retro Reflective Sensor – Part 1

    In this video I'm going to write a PLC program in STEP 7, create a relevant industrial application in Factory I/O from scratch and then connect the two software and test the PLC program in the 3D environment.

  • 149. Part Counting PLC Program Using Retro Reflective Sensors – Part 2

    Factory I/O is an innovative software package that allows you to create graphics that represent the machinery that you wish to control and then test your PLC program with the graphics, in a 3D environment. This lesson demonstrates the different tools you will use to place and manipulate your grap...

  • 150. Part Counting PLC Program Using Retro Reflective Sensors – Part 3

    Previously, we used the Factory I/O software package to create graphics that represent the machinery that we want control with a PLC program. This lesson will provide you with information on how to simulate the graphics environment with or without the use of the PLC program.
    Factory I/O allows y...

  • 151. Part Counting PLC Program Using Retro Reflective Sensors – Part 4

    In this lesson, we are going to learn how to connect our PLC program to the Factory I/O simulator. We will walk through the configuration process for connecting to a PLC or PLC simulator using the proper driver for our equipment. We will demonstrate how to associate our field devices, such as the...

  • 152. Part Counting PLC Program Using Retro Reflective Sensors – Part 5

    In this lesson, Factory I/O and our PLC program are now connected and we will start the factory simulation to see how our code checks out. We will discuss normally closed field devices and how they will function within our code. We will also discuss how the retro reflective sensor works and get i...

  • 153. Part Counting PLC Program Using Retro Reflective Sensors – Part 6

    In the previous lesson, we had our PLC software connected to the Factory I/O software. We were able to start and stop the equipment, verify product counts passing by the retro reflective sensors, all using the Factory I/O animated simulation and our program.

    One thing that we have not yet dis...

  • 154. How to Convert an Integer Value to a Real Value

    As you may know, there are several conversion instructions for use in most PLC programming softwares however, sometimes they can be a bit tricky to use.

    In this lesson we are going to discuss converting and integer value to a real value using conversion instructions. However, there is no direc...

  • 155. How to Round a Number in Your PLC Program

    In our daily activities, we may add things in our head to estimate some value to maybe stay within budget or just find some roundabout price.

    In this lesson, we are going to show you how to use one of the many instructions included in STEP 7 to do the everyday rounding that you may need insid...

  • 156. How to Convert a Real Value to Integer

    At times, we may need to convert a real or fraction value to an integer for use in our programs. In this lesson we will explain a simple trick to get the result that we are looking for. The first step in the process of this conversion process is truncation. We will then simply use the 16 bit lowe...

  • 157. How Does the Move Instruction Work?

    Sometimes we need to get data from one place in our PLC Program to another. Oftentimes, to do this, we will use the Move instruction. In this lesson we will discuss what parameters are needed to fulfill the instruction, what the Move instruction does, and what you can’t do with the Move instructi...

  • 158. Control Multiple Outputs with a Single Switch

    In some instances, you may want to energize multiple outputs using a single input. We discuss different ways to do this and settle on a particular method. While there are many ways to handle this task, we demonstrate the easiest integration of this feature. This method is not only easy to employ,...

  • 159. How to Vary the Value in a Single Set-point – Part 1

    In many factory environments, the need to vary the value in a single set-point exists. This need may be based on some internal programming or external action. Whatever the mechanism, in this lesson, we will start programming this function.

    Our set-point change will be based on some internal t...

  • 160. How to Vary the Value in a Single Set-point – Part 2

    In a previous lesson we discussed the need to vary the value in a single set-point. We started the lesson discussing some of the I/O that is required. We also created some code but found that we didn’t quite reach the intended goal.

    In the continuation of this lesson, we will show you how to ...

  • 161. How to Vary the Time Value in a Timer – Part 1

    In this lesson, we have a factory environment that has a conveyor, some switches that run the conveyor for different lengths of time, a stop switch, and a stack light with running and stopped lamps. We need to write a program that will run the conveyor for specified lengths of time. The timing in...

  • 162. How to Vary the Time Value in a Timer – Part 2

    In our previous lesson, we started writing some code to in order to run a conveyor for different lengths of time based on which input switch was triggered. In this lesson, we will continue writing our program to finish our time shifting quest.

    We will add some more code that changes our timer...

  • 163. How to Resume Interrupted Timing for Timers – Part 1

    On some occasions, you may need to continue timing a process even after the enable input to the timer turns false. As you may know, once the timer enable input transitions from false to true again, the timer resets and begins timing from zero. In this lesson, we will show you how you can change t...

  • 164. How to Resume Interrupted Timing for Timers – Part 2

    As you know, when the timers enable input transitions to false, you will lose the timers accumulated value. In the previous lesson, we discussed the need to retain a timer’s accumulated value when the timers enable input transitions from true to false so that we can finish the timing process wher...

  • 165. How to Use a Single Switch as Both Start and Stop Switches

    There may be an occasion when you need to use a single switch in the field as both a start and stop command. In this lesson, we will demonstrate exactly how to use a switch first to start a single motor and then once the motor is running, use the same switch to stop the motor.

    You will also se...

  • 166. How to Vary the Time Value in a Timer with a Single Switch – Part 1

    In previous lessons we demonstrated how to vary the time value in a timer using three separate switches and some move instructions. In this lesson, we are going to accomplish the exact same task but using only a single switch.

    We will run the conveyor for 5 seconds with the first press, then ...

  • 167. How to Vary the Time Value in a Timer with a Single Switch – Part 2

    In the previous lesson we discussed some ways in which to organize your thoughts and some advice on to how to tackle your program writing tasks.

    In this lesson, we are going to expand on that advice and get started with the simplest portion of the program. We are going to discuss how we decid...

  • 168. How to Vary the Time Value in a Timer with a Single Switch – Part 3

    In the previous lesson we began with some simple timing logic and expanded the program a bit to include some things that we will need to keep track of our button presses. In this lesson, we continue with the logic, first adding some code to take care of the 7 seconds parameter.

    After completi...

  • 169. How to Vary the Time Value in a Timer with a Single Switch – Part 4

    In the previous lesson we created the logic that correctly moved all of the preset timer values with the corresponding press of the button. What we were not able to do was repeat the cycle. In this lesson, we will run through the logic that we have created so far and discuss the dilemma of not be...